Conclusion of the Fatherhood Series

We have come full circle – how exciting! Over the last few weeks in our Thursday blog series, we have looked at a question from each of the four sections of Owen Connolly’s book for fathers, “Standing on the Shoulders of Giants.” Looking at the full range of the human experience and the role of men in their families, Owen’s book addresses the relationship between men and women and how that affects their parenting, the raising of children from babies to teenagers, and the unique challenges that fathers face in the present day. He does this using a conversational question and answer format, based on his years of experience as a therapist in Dublin and abroad. We trust that you have enjoyed getting a glimpse of the wisdom on offer in the book. If you have missed out on any of the posts in the series, please feel free to click on the category Shoulders of Giants Book to access the posts published previously.

Please feel free to reach out to us at the Connolly Counselling Centre if you need to talk to someone about issues in your own life. We leave you with Owen’s own words closing out his book.

“During the writing of this book, I was aware that some people would be infuriated and others happy by the things I have to say about us as a species. Those controversies aside, I hope that you have learned much and that you have taken away the idea that, even if every book in every library were filled with praise for our ancestors, enough could never be said about those great survivors. I am confident, no matter what we do, no matter what our children are exposed to – be it painful suffering or other extreme hardship – the ones who have gone before us have left us a legacy of survival by their heroic endeavour and resilience. They have set the scene by improving the already flexible and able human being. They are the Giants on whose Shoulders we are Standing, enabling us to see further.”

Standing on the Shoulders of Giants book

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